Tag: entrepreneur meme

Sydney’s ‘Sydneys first street gang’ is making a name for itself in the city

The first Sydney street gang in Australia has emerged, and they’re making a lot of money.

The SOB (South Side Organised Crime) was created in 2012 by a group of friends who were bored and hungry.

They were members of a local street gang called The Big Chill, who were looking for a place to play.

“They weren’t really interested in the big business of street gangs,” said Mr Williams.

Their first foray into the entertainment industry came in 2011 when the gang launched their own music station, and in 2014 they created a series of TV shows called ‘Criminal Mixtapes’.

The first episode of their show ‘Solo’ was filmed in January 2015, and the show is available to watch on YouTube.

In 2014, they were able to secure the contract for the production of their own television show, ‘Sober’, which aired on Sky1 in the UK.

A series of films including ‘Crimewatch’ and ‘A Night at the SOB’ were also made.

Now, the SOG is on the move and the gang is moving into a new stage of growth.

Mr Williams said that he and his mates wanted to make something “that they could take with them and use as an inspiration for the future”.

“We wanted to go into the industry and help people,” he said.

One of their goals is to get a television show made in Sydney, which would then be broadcast in Australia.

So far, they’ve secured a $10,000 loan from the NSW Film Corporation, and Mr Williams said the gang has already invested in a production company in Melbourne, and a production studio in Sydney.

While the gang members have had a rough start in their careers, Mr Williams has said they’ve now turned a corner.

He said that as a result of the gang’s efforts, “they’ve been recognised as the first local street gangs in Australia”.

“I’ve always been interested in street gangs and how they’ve developed, but I had never seen anything like this before,” he added.

What do you think?

Are you a Sydney street thug?

Tell us your story below.

Topics:crime,police,crime-prevention,gang-religion-and-subversion,gang,sydney-2000

When a viral meme goes viral, everyone’s going to want to know what’s going on with it

The viral meme that went viral around the globe this week is called “Titania.”

In it, a group of people are standing in front of a mirror in a dark room.

They’re trying to make their skin more pigmented, but it’s not looking very good.

Suddenly, one of the people in the mirror looks down and sees a pigmented spot on his forehead.

It turns out to be a mole.

This is the story behind the meme, which quickly became the second-most popular on Instagram.

(We did a little more digging to see if anyone noticed this, and we didn’t.)

But this isn’t the only viral meme from the year.

In February, a woman in Japan made a viral video titled “Molten Body.”

She used a video of a mole to describe what happened when her body became a molar.

“I woke up with a mole on my forehead,” she said.

“And I’ve been thinking about this a lot, and I think the same thing is happening here.

I feel like this mole on your forehead has been there forever, and you’ve been feeling it for years.”

And a video posted in May by a woman named Chantal who had been diagnosed with cancer and was living in Australia, had more than 2.7 million views on YouTube.

She explained how she had been in a “perfect life,” and how she felt like her life was just beginning to get back on track.

But then, “I suddenly became aware of something I didn’t want to have happen, and it started to affect my life,” she told The Huffington Post.

“It’s like, ‘I can’t let this happen.

I’m going to have to start looking for a mole.'”

The problem with this is that it’s really easy to go viral, and to get the meme that gets shared and talked about.

If you’ve ever watched a YouTube video, you know the same story: a group is standing in a room with a mirror, and a person in the room sees a mole that’s been there for years.

And they just don’t want anyone to think they’re doing anything wrong.

But it’s also hard to get away from the fact that people are going to be looking at your mole and thinking, “Oh, I’m not a bad person for not being able to have a mole, right?

And I can see how you might be feeling.”

It’s all very human, but also really silly, according to Dr. Daniel C. Siegel, a dermatologist and researcher who has studied viral memes for more than a decade.

“In some ways, this is a form of social contagion, a viral contagion in the sense that people get to see their own actions and their own reactions to a viral story,” Siegel told The HuffPost.

“You’re not just showing up to see what’s trending on Facebook, you’re showing up in person.”

The truth is, viral memes are not the only thing that happens in your life.

They can also happen to you.

“What people often forget is that viral memes aren’t necessarily just an image that happens on a screen,” Skelton said.

They are real, lasting relationships.

“People are going through the grieving process of grieving for a loved one, grieving for someone they love, and then when they get to this stage, they may be grieving because they’re grieving for their own personal relationship.

But if they look back and say, ‘Oh, that’s my wife,’ then that’s a good, human connection,” he added.

So what’s the best way to handle a viral moment that feels real?

In his book, “The Perfect Storm,” Sigmund Freud wrote about the “perfect storm.”

He wrote that a “seamless and unbroken” connection can lead to a feeling of happiness, which can lead people to a sense of belonging and trust.

“When we see a viral situation, it’s like watching a beautiful, serendipitous moment,” Sargeant said.

In other words, it doesn’t have to be just a photo of a face on a phone.

It can also be something that you’re already feeling, and that you want to share.

“So I would recommend that people, if they are feeling really upset, to share that moment with their family,” Sankin said.

If someone else feels sad, he said, it is also important to share it with them.

“The problem is that we tend to forget that there’s a real connection,” Sige told HuffPost.

That connection can be an image or text, or a photo.

Sigmond Freud’s “seaman’s ladder” idea is also one that we have come to accept in the modern world.

The idea that you can reach an understanding and trust with someone through sharing a moment in time, Sargeet said.

But when you start sharing something so much, it can feel very different.

How to Start a Meme About Entrepreneur Entrepreneur’s Kid, an Indiegogo campaign

Students at the University of California, Irvine, have created an Indigogo campaign called “Entertain the Kid,” which encourages students to take a selfie with an animated video of a child playing in a toy store.

The campaign, which launched on Wednesday and has been viewed more than 3.7 million times, asks students to send in their selfies with a hashtag that can be found on the video’s thumbnail.

Students can then tag the video on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Snapchat, or Google+ for up to 24 hours, after which the images will be tagged with their username.

The hashtag is the same one used on the Indiego campaign, and can be easily found in any photo on Instagram or Google+.

“Entertaining the Kid” has been created by a group of students from the University and the University College London, as well as from UC Irvine.

The group is asking students to tag their selfies in a hashtag on the original video.

“Students who use this hashtag will be able to tag the videos on Instagram and Twitter for up for 24 hours and will be rewarded for their work,” the group wrote on its website.

“This way, we will get students engaged with this topic, and make it fun to share,” the students said.

The Indiegobewomen group added that they will continue to make the video available for other students to share on their social media accounts.